Posts tagged as: Web

Save_as

Generative visual identity for Save_as, experimental publishing research platform.

Save_as is an online research platform which investigates with publishing formats and their transformation in the digital age. They research in a wide area and don’t exclude any direction

The whole identity and the logo is made from this idea of link from one input to an output. The logo is generative and the link can actually split and rotate at 360°.

Cooked in Montreuil

Design and development of the website of a French organic food service for kids.

Cooked in Montreuil is a French company which aim is to provide organic food for babies in creches and essentially in the city of Montreuil.

I designed a rounded logotype and a playful identity their website. The flashy but natural colors give the whole a playful flavour, and above all, a not so serious feeling.

I also created a series of icons which they fell in love with. I incorporated it in a dingbats font, which allows the company to compose its own charts with the keyboard. The illustrations of the website can thus be updated as they want.

Development: HTML, PHP (WordPress), CSS, jQuery

 

Vlisco

A new wavy website for the Dutch specialist of wax fabrics.

Vlisco is one of the biggest designer and producer of wax fabrics. Based in The Netherlands, their most important market is in Africa. Often copied, their main difference resides in the quality of their fabrics and their ancestral printing process.
They needed a brand new mobile friendly website which could show their specificities but also boost the sales.

 

As lead of the UX and art direction, I decided to focus on trying to show the beauty and details of their fabrics the best way possible on a digital device. For that, we used different interactions, in order to see the fabric as an object (mobile, interactive, 3d) and not as a static image (static, flat and rigid).
 
The main idea was to interact with the fabric as much as possible and to make it become the most central actor of the website of Vlisco. This simple rule was applied: anytime a fabric would display on the page, it should always be possible to buy it or see the other pages where it would also display.

View of the collection of ancestral stories about the fabrics.

Pop-up with showing one fabric on the left and its story on the right. The user can directly access all the different parts of the website concerning this fabric: its designer, the looks designed with this fabric, its story, and the shop.
the other colors

View of the lookbook with different filters.

Pop-up with a look from the lookbook on the right and the fabric used on the left.

 

Interaction with the fabric and the mouse when the fabric displays in full screen.

Views of the mobile version.

Project Indefensible

An interactive and social-oriented reader webpage for the World Peace Foundation.

Project Indefensible emerged out of a series of research and discussion workshops sponsored by the World Peace Foundation with leading experts on the global arms business. Together, the group defined a goal for their collaboration of fostering an evidence-driven, accountable, and transparent approach to public discussions of the global arms business. The end result of this collaboration is the text of Indefensible.

LUST approached the design and implementation of the website as a critical tool for collaborative reading and writing—offering speculations on scalable reading experiences between all target audiences, situations, and locations centered on the thematics of the Indefensible text.
I worked on the art direction and the design of the website.
The website presents an interactive multi column layout which allows the user to easily browse and cross the references and emphasizes the journalistic tone of the text.
Every time that the website is launched, the user is given a color which is the one used for any interaction with the platform. It turns the strict black and white layout into a lively platform.

 

Visual Index

The visual index is a miniaturization of the text, providing an overview of the text for navigational purposes. This is an immaterial method of way-finding within long texts—analogous to the pages in a printed book. As an index to the content, it gives context for the content readers interact with, as well as a means to reinterpretation of reading through navigation.

Contextual Search

Contextual search provides the reader with an ability to generate an alternate compilation of a text from their own search terms. The occurrence of these terms is reflected in the n-gram; a graph that visualizes their frequency within flow of the original text. This re-interpretation creates an new narrative structure and approach to literary reading. Endless interpretations are possible, sourcing from the reader’s own interests within the text. This opens discussion on audience-generated interpretation and linearity in media as a critical media-making tool.

 

Social Sharing

Social sharing allows one to share their session or portions of the reading onto social media. This launches a re-contextualization of the text onto new platforms of community phenomena to result in discourse and meaning-making within larger cultural spheres.

 

Annotations

The creation of reader annotations is generative of a parallel narrative to the original text. The audience is invited to engage with the content by taking notes and reacting alongside the original. As their own set of annotations is compiled, the annotations take on their own form as a piece of literary media. As the original text and annotations exist laterally, they come together to produce an new and anthropologically-rich reading.

 

Session Sharing

Each unique session of annotations produces a sharable link, where the reader can invite others to collaborate in session of annotating. This way of reading, note-taking, and reflection is a facilitator critical engagement and discussion. These sessions invite multiple narratives to exist in dialogue with text, generating multiple readings of the literature.

Text by Eric Li

Institute of Network Cultures Reader

A online reader for the website of the Institute of Network Cultures

The Institute of Network Cultures has published the Theory on Demand book series since 2009 as print-on-demand and ebooks. The main audience is made of students and academicians.

The current platform was only showing static files (PDF or ebooks) which were not easily readable; also, the main platform lacked of interactivity.

As a part of the Navigating Theory on Demand research project (in collaboration with Josip Batinic and with the help of Lucia Dossin), I questioned the current platform in order to improve the reading’s experience and to make the publications easily readable and browsable online. This project aims to find a new way of interacting with the publications and their content, by breaking away from the limitations of print and ebook.

For this project, we conduced a survey on online’s reading habits as well as usability test and a beta testing of the platform with the audience of the MoneyLab symposium.

http://networkcultures.org/navigating-tod/

The publications are browsable with a series of filters.

The main information about the publication shows clearly on the top of the page: title, author, description.

The text displays the main keywords of the text, as well as the results of a built-in search tool.

A definition tool and a referencing tool are also available in order to help the reader understanding and quoting this text for academic purposes.